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Archive for the ‘Law’ Category

EPA May Give 1st Approval of Nanosilver for Fabrics

In Law, nano, Nanoscale on August 19, 2010 at 2:42 pm

see here

 

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European Community Law and Nanotechnology: A Risky Business?

In Governance, Law, regulation on July 15, 2009 at 4:09 pm

26th June 2009
by Dr Naomi Salmon, Department of Law and Criminology, Aberystwyth
University, Wales, UK

‘No data, no market’ for nanotechnologies, MEPs say

In Governance, Law, nano, Nanoscale, Policy, regulation on April 8, 2009 at 11:28 pm

more here

to be estabblished call for members

In Law, nano, Nanoscale on March 4, 2009 at 4:56 pm

Canadian Standards Association would like to inform you that we are establishing a new Nanotechnology in Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Technical Committee for the adoption/adaptation of international ISO/IEC nanotechnology standards into National Standards of Canada. We have attached the Call for Participants which will provide you with information about this project. If you or a member of your organization is interested in applying to be a member of this new Technical Committee, please submit your application to the Project Manager Ron Meyers at: ron.meyers@csa.ca.

Please feel free to pass this message along to your colleagues who may be interested in this standards activity. The deadline for submitting applications is March 31st, 2009. Please contact me if you have any questions.
Sincerely,

Davorah Katz

Project Assistant

Occupational Health and Safety/Mechanical Industrial Equipment Safety

Canadian Standards Association

5060 Spectrum Way, Suite 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5N6

Email: Davorah.Katz@csa.ca

Canada to Require Companies to Report Quantity, Usage, Toxicity of Nanomaterials

In Health, Law, Medicine, Nanoscale, NBICS on January 29, 2009 at 5:17 am

see here

Bill Introduced to Ensure Safety of Nanotechnology, Transparency of Research, USA

In Law, nano, Nanoscale, NBICS on January 15, 2009 at 11:13 pm

(Washington, DC, January 15, 2009) – Today, the House Science and
Technology Committee introduced H.R. 554, National Nanotechnology
Initiative Amendments Act of 2009
. Identical to H.R. 5940
, which passed
the 110th Congress
by 407 to
6, H.R. 554 will strengthen and provide transparency to the federal
research effort to understand the potential environmental, health, and
safety risks of nanotechnology. It requires the agencies participating
in the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to develop a plan for
the environmental and safety research, and a roadmap for implementing
it, which includes explicit near-term and long-term goals and the
funding required, by goal and by agency. The bill also seeks to leverage
private sector investments in nanotechnology and facilitate technology
transfer by strengthening public/private partnerships.

“The range of potential applications of nanotechnology is broad-from
solar cells to sunscreen, from electronics to energy transformation and
storage, to medicine and health,” stated Chairman Bart Gordon (D-TN).
“It is important that potential downsides of the technology be addressed
from the beginning in a straightforward and open way, both to protect
the public health and to allay any concerns about the validity of the
results. A thorough, transparent process that ensures the safety of new
products will allow both the business community and the public to
benefit from the development of these new technologies.”

The NNI is multi-agency federal research program established in 2003
though the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act of
2003 (P.L.
108-153). It addresses all aspects of nanotechnology, including
environmental, health and safety (EHS) research. A December 2008
National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report concluded that the NNI still
lacks an adequate strategic plan and planning process for EHS research.
Over the past several years the House Science and Technology Committee
has carried out numerous oversight activities to encourage the
development and implementation of such a plan, with limited success.
H.R. 554 addresses the key recommendations in the NAS report. In
addition, the legislation requires that responsibility for overseeing
the development and implementation of an EHS research plan be assigned
to a single senior official at the Office of Science and Technology
Policy.

The legislation originally developed from the recommendations from other
formal reviews of NNI by the National Academy of Sciences and the
advisory panel of NNI.

Please see the Committee’s website
for more information on the
Committee’s work on Nanotechnology in the 110th Congress, including
hearings
and markups
.

Bill Introduced to Ensure Safety of Nanotechnology, Transparency of
Research

(Washington, DC, January 15, 2009) – Today, the House Science and
Technology Committee introduced H.R. 554, National Nanotechnology
Initiative Amendments Act of 2009
. Identical to H.R. 5940
, which passed
the 110th Congress
by 407 to
6, H.R. 554 will strengthen and provide transparency to the federal
research effort to understand the potential environmental, health, and
safety risks of nanotechnology. It requires the agencies participating
in the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to develop a plan for
the environmental and safety research, and a roadmap for implementing
it, which includes explicit near-term and long-term goals and the
funding required, by goal and by agency. The bill also seeks to leverage
private sector investments in nanotechnology and facilitate technology
transfer by strengthening public/private partnerships.

“The range of potential applications of nanotechnology is broad-from
solar cells to sunscreen, from electronics to energy transformation and
storage, to medicine and health,” stated Chairman Bart Gordon (D-TN).
“It is important that potential downsides of the technology be addressed
from the beginning in a straightforward and open way, both to protect
the public health and to allay any concerns about the validity of the
results. A thorough, transparent process that ensures the safety of new
products will allow both the business community and the public to
benefit from the development of these new technologies.”

The NNI is multi-agency federal research program established in 2003
though the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act of
2003 (P.L.
108-153). It addresses all aspects of nanotechnology, including
environmental, health and safety (EHS) research. A December 2008
National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report concluded that the NNI still
lacks an adequate strategic plan and planning process for EHS research.
Over the past several years the House Science and Technology Committee
has carried out numerous oversight activities to encourage the
development and implementation of such a plan, with limited success.
H.R. 554 addresses the key recommendations in the NAS report. In
addition, the legislation requires that responsibility for overseeing
the development and implementation of an EHS research plan be assigned
to a single senior official at the Office of Science and Technology
Policy.

The legislation originally developed from the recommendations from other
formal reviews of NNI by the National Academy of Sciences and the
advisory panel of NNI.

Please see the Committee’s website
for more information on the
Committee’s work on Nanotechnology in the 110th Congress, including
hearings
and markups
.

http://science.house.gov/press/PRArticle.aspx?NewsID=2338

CENARIOS on track to become global nanotechnology safety standard

In Conference, Law, nano, Nanoscale on October 13, 2008 at 8:00 pm

(Nanowerk News) In the context of the 4th NanoRegulation Conference from September 16-17 in St.Gallen (Switzerland), the globally active certification company TÜV SÜD Industrie Service GmbH presented the CENARIOS® certification standard. The first and only nano safety standard with certificate worldwide brings transparency and safety for companies, authorities, investors and consumers.
more here

Nano review by Food Safety Authority of Ireland calls for adequate regulatory controls

In Food, Law, nano, Nanoscale on October 13, 2008 at 7:58 pm

see here
full report here

No regulatory void on nanotech, says European Commission

In Law, nano, Nanoscale, NBICS on October 13, 2008 at 7:40 pm

While knowledge gaps remain regarding the potential risks of nanotechnologies, the European Commission again expressed confidence that existing EU regulation can be applied to this emerging sector, stressing that the challenge ahead lies in their implementation.
more here

Canadian academies report on Nanotechnology

In Governance, Health, Law, nano, Nanoscale on July 10, 2008 at 3:52 pm

The Council of Canadian Academies has been asked by the federal Minister of Health: “What is the state of knowledge with respect to existing nanomaterial properties and their health and environmental risks, which could underpin regulatory perspectives on needs for research, risk assessment and surveillance?”

An Expert Panel on Nanotechnology has been appointed by the Council of Canadian Academies to address this question. Scientific knowledge, or evidence, is broadly interpreted to include natural sciences and engineering, as well as social sciences.
more here

here a Globe and Mail article

Council of Canadian Academies news release

Scientists Identify Genes for brain development

In Ableism, Enhancement, Genes, Genetic, Governance, Health, Law, Medicine, Neuro on July 7, 2008 at 2:12 pm

see here the academic paper

and here a write up on it

interestingly the write up title is

Scientists Identify Genes that Could Turn Ordinary People into Supergeniuses (or Mindless Drones)

What sort of coverage: Amputees fight caps in coverage for prosthetics

In Ableism, Bionic, Disabled People, Governance, Health, Law, Medicine on June 10, 2008 at 6:29 pm

By Dave Gram, Associated Press

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. – After bone cancer forced the amputation of her
right leg below the knee, Eileen Casey got even more bad news: Her
insurer told her that she had spent her $10,000 lifetime coverage limit
on her temporary limb and that the company wouldn’t pay for a permanent
one……
more here

Question: One the one hand society promotes a body image and a social environment that seems to make legs essential 9most places are still not set up for non leg modes of movements)and on the other hand they are not willing to enable one to have the legs.
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