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Posts Tagged ‘Health’

Nanomaterials May Have Large Environmental Footprint

In nano, Nanoscale on November 3, 2008 at 3:17 am

ScienceDaily (Oct. 23, 2008) ‚ÄĒ Environmental gains derived from the use
of nanomaterials may be offset in part by the process used to
manufacture them, according to research published in a special issue of
the Journal of Industrial Ecology.
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Nanotechnology Boosts War On Superbugs

In Health, Microbe, nano, Nanoscale on October 13, 2008 at 8:04 pm

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Canadian academies report on Nanotechnology

In Governance, Health, Law, nano, Nanoscale on July 10, 2008 at 3:52 pm

The Council of Canadian Academies has been asked by the federal Minister of Health: ‚ÄúWhat is the state of knowledge with respect to existing nanomaterial properties and their health and environmental risks, which could underpin regulatory perspectives on needs for research, risk assessment and surveillance?‚ÄĚ

An Expert Panel on Nanotechnology has been appointed by the Council of Canadian Academies to address this question. Scientific knowledge, or evidence, is broadly interpreted to include natural sciences and engineering, as well as social sciences.
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here a Globe and Mail article

Council of Canadian Academies news release

Salamander-inspired therapy may aid injured vets

In Health, Regenerative Medicine on May 31, 2008 at 11:48 pm

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (CNN) — Last week in an operating room in Texas, a wounded American soldier underwent a history-making procedure that could help him regrow the finger that was lost to a bomb attack in Baghdad, Iraq, last year.

Army Sgt. Shiloh Harris’ doctors applied specially formulated powder to what’s left of the finger in an effort to do for wounded soldiers what salamanders can do naturally: replace missing body parts.Technorati Tags: ,

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Virtual biopsy can tell whether colon polyp is benign without removal

In e-health, Health, Medicine, Sensor on May 26, 2008 at 2:29 pm

A probe so sensitive that it can tell whether or not a cell living within the human body is veering towards cancer development may revolutionize how future colonoscopies are done, say researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla.

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Cell ‘organs’ get plastic upgrades

In Enhancement, Health, Medicine on May 26, 2008 at 2:25 pm

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , Human cells could have their metabolisms upgraded without altering their genes by inserting tiny plastic packages of enzymes, Swiss researchers have shown. They hope the technique could allow advanced cancer therapies, or even upgrade a person’s metabolism.

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“Wireless Healthcare 2008”

In e-health, Health, Information Technology, Telehealth on May 24, 2008 at 4:34 am

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The Ultimate Cure

In Ableism, Bionic, Cogno, Disabled People, Enhancement, Health, nano, Nanoscale, NBICS, Neuro on May 24, 2008 at 2:01 am

The neurotech industry is engaged in a $2 trillion race to fix your brain. Many players will fail, but the payoff will be huge for those who succeed.

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Remote Microscopy

In e-health, Health, Telehealth on May 23, 2008 at 3:25 pm

Hat tip to Sheila Moorcroft, Research Director, Shaping Tomorrow

more herehere
and here

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World health statistics 2008

In Books, Disabled People, Health on May 23, 2008 at 1:18 pm

Ten highlights in health statistics 7-34
Progress towards MDG 5: maternal mortality 8
Coverage gap and inequity in maternal, neonatal and child health interventions 10
HIV/AIDS estimates are revised downwards 13
Progress in the fight against malaria 15
Reducing deaths from tobacco 18
Breast cancer: mortality and screening 21
Divergent trends in mortality slow down improvements in life expectancy in Europe 24
Monitoring disease outbreaks: meningococcal meningitis in Africa 27
Future trends in global mortality: major shifts in cause of death patterns 29
Reducing impoverishment caused by catastrophic health care spending 32
References

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Scheme to Let Robot Take Over Brain-Computer Interface

In Bionic, Cogno, Disabled People, Enhancement, Governance, Health, Information Technology, nano, Nanoscale, NBICS, Neuro, Robotics on May 23, 2008 at 2:26 am

20 May 2008‚ÄĒA group of mechanical engineers at Caltech have come up with a way to guide miniature robots in the task of inserting and positioning electrode arrays in brain tissue. What they propose would be the first robotic approach to establishing an interface between computers and the brain by positioning electrodes in neural tissue.

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A Brief History of Asbestos Use and Associated Health Risks

In Governance, Health, Paralympics on May 22, 2008 at 4:48 pm

If one is into history this seems to be interesting.
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Carbon nanotubes introduced into the abdominal cavity of mice show asbestos-like pathogenicity in a pilot study

In Health, nano, Nanoscale on May 22, 2008 at 4:01 am

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Nature Nanotechnology
Published online: 20 May 2008 | doi:10.1038/nnano.2008.111

Carbon nanotubes introduced into the abdominal cavity of mice show asbestos-like pathogenicity in a pilot study

Craig A. Poland1, Rodger Duffin1, Ian Kinloch2, Andrew Maynard3, William A. H. Wallace1, Anthony Seaton4, Vicki Stone5, Simon Brown1, William MacNee1 & Ken Donaldson1

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes1 have distinctive characteristics2, but their needle-like fibre shape has been compared to asbestos3, raising concerns that widespread use of carbon nanotubes may lead to mesothelioma, cancer of the lining of the lungs caused by exposure to asbestos4. Here we show that exposing the mesothelial lining of the body cavity of mice, as a surrogate for the mesothelial lining of the chest cavity, to long multiwalled carbon nanotubes results in asbestos-like, length-dependent, pathogenic behaviour. This includes inflammation and the formation of lesions known as granulomas. This is of considerable importance, because research and business communities continue to invest heavily in carbon nanotubes for a wide range of products5 under the assumption that they are no more hazardous than graphite. Our results suggest the need for further research and great caution before introducing such products into the market if long-term harm is to be avoided.

1. MRC/University of Edinburgh, Centre for Inflammation Research, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK
2. School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS, UK
3. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20004-3027, USA
4. Institute of Occupational Medicine, Research Avenue North, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AP, UK
5. School of Life Sciences, Napier University, Colinton Road, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK

Correspondence to: Ken Donaldson1 e-mail: ken.donaldson@ed.ac.uk

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